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A Summary of

What Makes a Great Product Manager

by
Lawrence Ripsher
Hacker Noon
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Behaviors commonly seen in great product managers

  1. Starts with Why: articulate clearly why users would use the product
  2. Builds products that solve for her own problems to develop empathy for customers
  3. Sets goals, measures, communicates clearly: Goals are aspirational (to help people dream), realistic (to keep people focused) and quantifiable (to help guide the way)
  4. Market awareness: know product market fit and competition, share information with team members
  5. Seeks out mentors. Mentors others: best way to learn is from someone who has already done what you want to do
  6. Builds trust: environment where people have each other's back
  7. Understands the “how”: know technical feasibility
  8. Embraces constraints: avoid open-ended statement like "we could do anything"
  9. Invests in strengths: have clear strengths that differentiate herself
  10. Prioritizes: force important tradeoff at right time
  11. Asks for forgiveness, not for permission: encourage and reward responsible risk takin
  12. Thrives on change and ambiguity: during volatile times, help others and provide clarity and assurance
  13. Is curious, values curiosity: life-long learner and value diversity of thoughts
  14. Is data driven: collect and understand data informally, efficiently and DIY
  15. Simplifies the complex: summarize, decompose problems into most important key questions and solutions
  16. Values trying over talking, impact over activity, creation over criticism: get hands dirty, lead with action
  17. Can zoom in, and zoom out: operate comfortably at both the detailed or the bigger picture level
  18. Has a strong point of view, weakly held by opening to new ideas
  19. Creates materials that can be highly leveraged with just the right amount that fits the purpose
  20. Gives feedback. Seeks feedback: good feedback is specific, useful and delivered with the best of intentions.
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